The Spain Diaries – Enchanting Toledo

From the Academy Award Winner … Wait! I think I have to stop watching Honest Trailers on YouTube so intensely. Let’s take it from the start…

From the 20-something blogger, who last week showed you how to successfully get lost in gardens, here comes a step to step guide to getting lost dawdling in Toledo.

I loved Toledo with all my heart. Something tells me it’s because it reminded me so vividly of Corfu, but who can blame me? The alleys, the buildings, the pouring RAIN… and the bright sun that followed it.

So here’s what you see when you walk your way from the train station to the central (?) entrance of Toledo. Mr. Weather wasn’t in such a good mood that way, but we weren’t willing to give up.

First piece of advice regarding Toledo: If you’re planning on staying there, which implies that you may or may not have a piece of luggage with you (if you belong to the second category, I salute and worship you. I could never do that.), make sure you’re traveling with a male companion, preferably related to you or having romantic feelings towards you, because upon arrival, this city is full of stairs and ascending streets and you’re going to need some help to transport the aforementioned luggage to the hotel. Thank you, dear.

This is Santa Cruz, which is also a museum. A museum we never entered to be exact. It belongs to the Holy Trinity that holds the works of El Greco safe – the other ones is the Museo de El Greco and … Oops, I think I forgot. It’s a guide for getting lost after all, right?

While trying to get to our hotel, which I booked through booking.com and I would definitely suggest it, we came across a litany, because after all it was a Sunday morning. Please, correct me if it’s something different, but in the Christian Orthodox country, where I come from, that’s what it would look like.

Followed by a marching band, which is so Corfu! Picture me throwing my hands in the air with enthusiasm and smiling widely – it was pretty scary!

They were marching around the Cathderal, which was – just like all Cathedrals in this country – an imposing building with beautiful architectural details. I’ll show you more later on, for the time being we have to get to the hotel first.
That’s the view from the window! You could lean over the railing and see the Cathedral.

Having successfully checked in and politely asked the hostess for an umbrella, we went straight to the Museo de El Greco. 

The museum was founded by Marquis of Vega Inclán and includes diverse works of Domenikos Theotokopoulos, more widely known as El Greco; pieces from the 16th and 17th centuries that are not only representative of his work particularly in the last years of his life, but also of culture and society in Toledo at that time. It’s also called La Casa Museo, because, when Marquis bought the building in the beginning of the 20th century, he thought it to be El Greco’s residence. Unfortunately, it is not, but that shouldn’t discourage you from visiting; it is a lovely Spanish house, refurbished and very characteristic of this era. If I have to be brutally honest with you, which is what I mostly do here, I left slightly unimpressed. I found Prado’s exhibition El Greco & Modern Painting much more telling and intriguing, but I’ll keep you in the dark about it until the next post.

After Museo de El Greco, we made a short stop for lunch and decided to stroll around the city.
And somehow ended around the Cathedral. Again.
This was actually great, since now I had the chance to photograph it from all angles and pay attention to the details without having to elbow middle-aged church enthusiasts along the way.

I fell in love with these little glass balconies; you can find them in Madrid, as well.

In case you want to get drunk before supper – and without anyone suspecting you – head to Mazapan El Flor Cafe Bar at Plaza Zocodover and ask for an Irish cofee. No one will know; it’ll be our naughty little secret.

After some point we ditched the map. It was a matter of wandering and spontaneously deciding betwen ‘left or right?’

At some point we found ourselves looking at Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes. All it took it was twice left and a ‘can we go up these stairs, please?’

So we did.

Having a panoramic view of… pretty much anything gives you time to think.

But, then, it can get lonely. So I decided to befriend this little old, greying dog who was eyeing me suspiciously.

There was a special chemistry as well as mutual understanding between us…

…especially since we both made all that long way up to admire the beautiful view. That’s river Tajo, I think.

At the end we said our goodbyes and parted, each of us off to a different direction.

That’s the gate where we initially entered Toledo on a rainy Sunday morning. I took this photo the following Monday, upon leaving.

The weather wasn’t promising much but fog, but… oh, that wonderful light!

Un beso enor…

Huh, did you really thought I was going to finish it off and desert you that way?

Here’s a little behind the scenes!

In case you’ve been following me on Instagram, you probably already know I have a healthy obsession with swings!

And that I’m dating Mary Poppins.

Fogity, fogity, fog!

The Cathedral at night.

There’s only one time to get your map – or navi – out in Toledo and try not to get lost, because you really want to have tapas and drinks at La Abadia. The food is mouth-watering, the service fast and friendly, and the place really cozy. You are most likely to meet locals there, as well as picky travelers. Their tapas compos are strictly for carnivores, but they will get you hooked!

And now…

Lots of love and kisses,

F.
PS: Facebook anyone? Tweet me maybe? 
PS2: Now I’m also on Instagram!

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0 Comments

  1. So many beautiful pictures 😀 Du hast dir die Haare geschnitten! Sieht gut, aber ungewohnt aus!
    He, Julián, dein Name ist einfacher auszusprechen, wenn du bei "Mary Poppins" bleibst 😉

  2. Haha da hast du Recht! Ja, ich hab die gegen Ende August geschnitten. Es gefällt mir, aber ab und zu vermisse ich auch meine lange Haare. 😛

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